US Yacht Ensign

$19.95

Heavy marine-grade nylon treated to resist UV rays.


Sewn stripes with a double lock-stitched row of strong color matched polyester thread.


Densely embroidered and beautifully detailed design—not printed! (Appliqued design on 30" x 48" through 4' x 6')


We guarantee your satisfaction or your money back.


The US Yacht Ensign as an Important Part of American Maritime History

Annin Marine-Grade Nylon US Yacht Ensign

The US Yacht Ensign is one of our personal favorites, not only because of ts classic design, but because of its uniquely American place in maritime history. Although it was intended to be merely a signal flag, the US Yacht Ensign was nevertheless popularly used as an ensign in the days when sloops regularly plied the Hudson. And it’s just as popular today, if not more so.

Our US Yacht Ensign is made for us in America by Annin, a company that dates to lower Manhattan in the 1820’s when the sail-making Annin brothers began making flags along with the sails. Annin today is still family-owned and still sews each and every flag with the same traditional attention to detail and craftsmanship that Benjamin and Edward Annin did in the bustling New York seaport of early 19th century America.

Our Marine-Grade US Yacht Ensigns at a Glance

Heavy marine-grade nylon treated to resist UV rays.
Sewn stripes with a double lock-stitched row of strong color matched polyester thread.
Densely embroidered and beautifully detailed design—not printed! (Appliqued design on 30" x 48" through 4' x 6')
We guarantee your satisfaction or your money back.
The US Yacht Ensign as an Important Part of American Maritime History

When you fly our US Yacht Ensign, you’ll take part in a rich history and tradition that dates all the way back to 1847. It was in that year that New York Yacht Club Commodore John Cox Stevens first proposed a signal to be flown specifically to identify private yachts in US waters.

With our growing nation came prosperity and a growing number of non-commercial vessels sailing US coastal waters. Commodore Stevens, with the help of the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Navy, devised a way to bypass the Customs House when entering a port by hoisting a signal indicating this was a private vessel with no commercial cargo. “The American Ensign with the addition of a foul anchor in the union…” was the result.

Although Congress adopted the Yacht Ensign in 1849 with the stipulation that the flag was to be used only as a signal flag, it wasn’t long before yacht owners were quietly defying Congress by hoisting them as ensigns. Not long after that, a law was passed allowing for the use of the US Yacht Ensign as an acceptable replacement for the National Ensign (US flag) in domestic waters.

Today, the US Yacht Ensign is more popular than ever, even though the law officially recognizing it was repealed in 1980. Boat owners all over America are voting with their pocketbooks to continue this uniquely American tradition.

Write Your Own Review
Only registered users can write reviews. Please Sign in or create an account